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Bruce Crauder

Bruce Crauder received his B.A. from Haverford College and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. After post-doctoral positions at the Institute for Advanced Study, the University of Utah, and the University of Pennsylvania, Crauder came to Oklahoma State University, where he is now Professor of Mathematics and Associate Dean. Crauder’s research in algebraic geometry has resulted in 10 refereed articles in as many years in his specialty, three-dimensional birational geometry.


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Benny Evans

Benny Evans received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Michigan. He is currently Professor of Mathematics at Oklahoma State University, where he has served as undergraduate director, associate head, and department head. He has held visiting appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study, Rice University, and Texas A&M. His research interests are topology and mathematics education.


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Chris Franklin

Christine (Chris) Franklin is the K–12 Statistics Ambassador for the American Statistical Association and an elected ASA Fellow. Now retired from the University of Georgia as the Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor and Senior Lecturer Emerita in Statistics, she is also the coauthor of an Introductory Statistics textbook published with Pearson and has published more than 60 journal articles and book chapters. Chris was the lead writer for the groundbreaking document of the American Statistical Association Pre-K–12 Guidelines for the Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) Framework and chaired the writing team of the ASA Statistical Education of Teachers (SET) report. She is a past Chief Reader for Advanced Placement® Statistics, a Fulbright scholar to New Zealand (2015), recipient of the United States Conference on Teaching Statistics (USCOTS) Lifetime Achievement Award and the prestigious ASA Founder’s Award, and is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute (ISI). Chris loves being with her family, running, hiking, scoring baseball games, and reading mysteries.


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Jerry Johnson

Jerry Johnson received his B.S. in Mathematics from Oklahoma State University and his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Illinois, Urbana. He was on the faculty of Oklahoma State University from 1969 until 1993, when he moved to the University of Nevada, Reno to become director of their Math Center and Math Across the Curriculum Project. From 1995 to 2001 he was chairman of the Department of Mathematics. He has received fifteen funded grants, including seven from the National Science Foundation. He has published 17 refereed papers in mathematics research journals and 36 papers in various journals and conference proceedings related to mathematics education. He is the author of GyroGraphics, a mathematics software package for which he received the EDUCOM Distinguished Mathematics Software award in 1991.


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Stephen Kokoska

Steve Kokoska received his undergraduate degree from Boston College, and his M.S and Ph.D. from the University of New Hampshire. His initial research interests included the statistical analysis of cancer chemoprevention experiments. He has published a number of research papers in mathematics journals, including: Biometrics, Anticancer Research, and Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine. He has also presented results at national conferences, written several books, and been awarded grants from the National Science Foundation, the Center for Rural Pennsylvania, and the Ben Franklin Program.

Steve is a long-time consultant for the College Board and conducted workshops in Brazil, the Dominican Republic, and China. He was the AP Calculus Chief Reader for four years, and has been involved with calculus reform and the use of technology in the classroom. He has been teaching at Bloomsburg University for 25years and recently served as Director of the Honors Program.

Steve has been teaching introductory statistics classes throughout his academic career, and there is no doubt that this is his favorite course. This class (and text) provides students with basic, life-long, quantitative skills that they will use in almost any job and teaches them how to think and reason logically. Steve believes very strongly in data-driven decisions and conceptual understanding through problem solving.


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Kathleen Miranda

Kathleen Miranda, Ed.D from St. John's University, is an Emeritus Associate Professor of the State University of New York (SUNY) where she taught for 25 years. Kathleen is a recipient of the prestigious New York State Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, and particularly enjoys teaching mathematics to underprepared and fearful students.  In addition to her extensive classroom experience, Kathleen has worked an accuracy reviewer and solutions author on several mathematics textbooks, including Michael Sullivan’s Brief Calculus and Finite Mathematics. Kathleen’s goal is to help students unlock the complexities of calculus and appreciate its many applications.
 
Kathleen has four children: Edward, a plastic surgeon in San Francisco, James, an emergency medicine physician in Philadelphia, Kathleen, a chemical engineer, working on vaccines, and Michael, a management consultant specializing in corporate strategy.


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David S. Moore

David S. Moore is Shanti S. Gupta Distinguished Professor of Statistics, Emeritus, at Purdue University and was 1998 president of the American Statistical Association. He received his AB from Princeton and his PhD from Cornell, both in mathematics. He has written many research papers in statistical theory and served on the editorial boards of several major journals. Professor Moore is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has served as program director for statistics and probability at the National Science Foundation. In recent years, Professor Moore has devoted his attention to the teaching of statistics. He was the content developer for the Annenberg/Corporation for Public Broadcasting college-level telecourse Against All Odds: Inside Statistics and for the series of video modules Statistics: Decisions through Data, intended to aid the teaching of statistics in schools. He is the author of influential articles on statistics education and of several leading texts. Professor Moore has served as president of the International Association for Statistical Education and has received the Mathematical Association of America’s national award for distinguished college or university teaching of mathematics.


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Alan Noell

Alan Noell has a B.A. degree in Mathematics from Texas A&M University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Mathematics from Princeton University. After a postdoctoral position at CalTech, in 1985 he joined the faculty at Oklahoma State University, where he is now Professor of Mathematics. He research interests are in the area of several complex variables. He has also enjoyed working in the area of curriculum development. His work has been supported by the National Science Foundation and other sources


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Jon Rogawski

Jon Rogawski received his undergraduate and master’s degrees in mathematics simultaneously from Yale University, and he earned his PhD in mathematics from Princeton University, where he studied under Robert Langlands. Before joining the Department of Mathematics at UCLA in 1986, where he was a full professor, he held teaching and visiting positions at the Institute for Advanced Study, the University of Bonn, and the University of Paris at Jussieu and Orsay. Jon’s areas of interest were number theory, automorphic forms, and harmonic analysis on semisimple groups. He published numerous research articles in leading mathematics journals, including the research monograph Automorphic Representations of Unitary Groups in Three Variables (Princeton University Press). He was the recipient of a Sloan Fellowship and an editor of the Pacific Journal of Mathematics and the Transactions of the AMS. As a successful teacher for more than 30 years, Jon Rogawski listened and learned much from his own students. These valuable lessons made an impact on his thinking, his writing, and his shaping of a calculus text. Sadly, Jon Rogawski passed away in September 2011. Jon’s commitment to presenting the beauty of calculus and the important role it plays in students’ understanding of the wider world is the legacy that lives on in each new edition of Calculus.


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