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American Chemical Society-ACS

The American Chemical Society (ACS) is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry. Chemistry in the Community (ChemCom) is the result of an National Science Foundation (NSF) grant with the goal of improving chemical literacy among all high school students taking chemistry. 

ACS URL:  http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/resources/highschool/chemcom.html


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Franklin Bell

Franklin Bell is a consultant for the College Board, presenting at two-day and week-long conferences throughout the Southwest and Mid-Atlantic Regions. He has been a reader and a table leader for the AP Biology exam, and is a past member of the AP Biology Test Development Committee. Formerly, Franklin was the Science Department co-chair at Saint Mary’s Hall in San Antonio, Texas. In 2003, the College Board presented him with the Outstanding Achievement Award for his contributions to the Advanced Placement Program, and in 2006, the National Association of Biology Teachers distinguished Franklin as the Texas Outstanding Biology Teacher. During his 25 years as a high school science teacher, Franklin has spent 18 years teaching AP Biology. Along with AP Biology, he also currently teaches AP Environmental Science at Mercersburg Academy.


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Andrew Berry

Andrew Berry is Lecturer in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and an undergraduate advisor in the Life Sciences at Harvard University. With research interests in evolutionary biology and history of science, he teaches courses that either focus on one of the areas or combine the two. He has written two books: Infinite Tropics, a collection of the writings of Alfred Russel Wallace, and, with James D. Watson, DNA: The Secret of Life, which is part history, part exploration of the controversies surrounding DNA-based technologies.


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Andrew Biewener

Andrew Biewener is Charles P. Lyman Professor of Biology in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University and Director of the Concord Field Station. He teaches both introductory and advanced courses in anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics. His research focuses on the comparative biomechanics and neuromuscular control of mammalian and avian locomotion, with relevance to biorobotics. He is currently Deputy Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Experimental Biology. He also served as President of the American Society of Biomechanics.


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Neil F. Comins

Professor Neil F. Comins is on the faculty of the University of Maine. Born in 1951 in New York City, he grew up in New York and New England. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering physics at Cornell University, a master's degree in physics at the University of Maryland, and a Ph.D. in astrophysics from University College, Cardiff, Wales, under the guidance of Bernard F. Schutz. Dr. Comins's work for his doctorate, on general relativity, was cited in Subramanyan Chandrasekhar's Nobel laureate speech. He has done theoretical and experimental research in general relativity, optical and radio observational astronomy, computer simulations of galaxy evolution, and science education. He is also the author of five trade books, What if the Moon Didn't Exist?, Heavenly Errors, The Hazards of Space Travel, What if the Earth Had Two Moons?, and The Traveler’s Guide to Space. What if the Moon Didn't Exist? has been made into planetarium shows, been excerpted for television and radio, translated into several languages, and was the theme for the Mitsubishi Pavilion at the World Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan. Dr. Comins has appeared on numerous television and radio shows and gives many public talks. Although he has jumped out of airplanes while in the military, today his activities are a little more sedate: he is a licensed pilot and avid sailor, having once competed against Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.


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David Courard-Hauri

David Courard-Hauri is an Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Policy at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. At Drake, Dr. Courard-Hauri teaches courses on Environmental Science, Climate Change Science and Policy, Quantitative Methods in Environmental Decision Making, and Ecological Economics. With a PhD in Chemistry from Stanford University, and a Masters in Public Affairs from Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School, Dr. Courard-Hauri seeks in his research to combine aspects of environmental science, economics, and public policy in his work modeling economic consumption and its environmental impacts. He walks to work, and in his spare time cares for a multitude of fruit trees and berries in his yard.


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Brian Farrell

Brian D. Farrell is Director of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies and Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Curator in Entomology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University. He is an authority on coevolution between insects and plants and a specialist on the biology of beetles. He is the author of many scientific papers and book chapters on the evolution of ecological interactions between plants, beetles, and other insects in the tropics and temperate zone. Professor Farrell also spearheads initiatives to repatriate digital information from scientific specimens of insects in museums to their tropical countries of origin. In 2011–2012, he was a Fulbright Scholar to the Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic. Professor Farrell received a BA degree in Zoology and Botany from the University of Vermont and MS and PhD degrees from the University of Maryland.


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Roger Freedman

Dr. Roger A. Freedman is a Lecturer in Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

He was an undergraduate at the University of California campuses in San Diego and Los Angeles, and did his doctoral research in theoretical nuclear physics at Stanford University. He came to UCSB in 1981 after three years of teaching and doing research at the University of Washington. At UCSB, Dr. Freedman has taught in both the Department of Physics and the College of Creative Studies, a branch of the university intended for highly gifted and motivated undergraduates. In recent years, he has helped to develop computer-based tools for learning introductory physics and astronomy and has been a pioneer in the use of classroom response systems and the “flipped” classroom model at UCSB. Roger holds a commercial pilot’s license and was an early organizer of the San Diego Comic-Con, now the world’s largest popular culture convention.


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Andrew Friedland

Andrew J. Friedland is The Richard and Jane Pearl Professor in Environmental Studies and Chair of the Environmental Studies Program at Dartmouth. He was the founding chair of the Advanced Placement Test Development Committee (College Board) for Environmental Science. He has a strong interest in high school science education and in the early years of APES he participated in a number of trainer and teacher workshops at Kimball Union Academy, Dartmouth College, and elsewhere. During many of the last ten summers, he has guest lectured at the St. Johnsbury Academy (Vermont) AP Institute for Secondary Teachers. Friedland regularly teaches introductory environmental science and energy courses and has taught courses in forest biogeochemistry, global change, and soil science, as well as foreign study courses in Kenya. For more than two decades, Friedland has been researching the effects of air pollution (lead, nitrogen, sulfur, calcium) on high-elevation forests of New England and the Northeast. More recently, he has begun investigating the impact of individual choices and personal action on energy consumption and the environment.  Friedland has served on panels for the NSF and USDA Forest Service and has just finished serving on his third panel of the Science Advisory Board of the EPA. He has authored or coauthored more than fifty-five peer-reviewed publications and one book, Writing Successful Science Proposals (Yale University Press). Friedland received BAs in Biology and Environmental Studies and a PhD in Geology from the University of Pennsylvania.  He is passionate about saving energy and can be seen wandering the halls of the Environmental Studies Program at Dartmouth with a Kill-A-Watt meter, determining the electricity load of vending machines, data projectors, and computers.


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Gary Gladding

Professor Gary Gladding, a high energy experimentalist, joined the Department of Physics at Illinois as a research associate after receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1971.  He became assistant professor in 1973 and has, since 1985, been a full professor. He has done experiments at CERN, Fermilab, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, and the Cornell Electron Storage Ring.  He served as Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs for thirteen years. He was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society for his contributions to the improvement of large enrollment introductory physics courses. Since 1996, Professor Gladding has led the faculty group responsible for the success of the massive curriculum revision that has transformed the introductory physics curriculum here at Illinois. This effort has involved more than 50 faculty and improved physics instruction for more than 25,000 science and engineering undergraduate students. He has shifted his research focus over the last ten years to physics education research (PER) and currently leads the PER group. He is also heavily involved in preparing at-risk students for success in physics coursework through the development of Physics 100. Professor Gladding was also a key player in the creation and development of i>clicker™.


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Nicholas Green, MS, PhD

Nicholas Green is presently working with the Federal Government.  He received his Bachelor of Science in Biology from University of Louisville and his Ph.D. in Zoology from Baylor University.


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Diana Hacker

Diana Hacker personally class-tested her handbooks with nearly four thousand students over thirty-five years at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland, where she was a member of the English faculty. Hacker handbooks, built on innovation and on a keen understanding of the challenges facing student writers, are the most widely adopted in America. Hacker handbooks, all published by Bedford/St. Martin’s, include A Writer’s Reference, Ninth Edition (2018); A Pocket Style Manual, Eighth Edition (2018); The Bedford Handbook, Tenth Edition (2017); Rules for Writers, Eighth Edition (2016); and Writer’s Help 2.0, Hacker Version.


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David W. Hall

David W. Hall is an Associate Professor of Genetics at the University of Georgia, where he was the recipient of the Sandy Beaver Excellence in Teaching Award in 2013. Recent work includes using mathematical models to address the evolution of meiotic drive, the rate and pattern of molecular evolution in social insects, and early sex chromosome evolution. In the lab, he utilizes different yeast species to study spontaneous mutations using a combination of both mutation-accumulation and adaptation experiments. Since high school, he has been captivated by how the living world works. Like many students, he was initially overwhelmed by the diversity of life, but he came to realize that there are fundamental principles that unite organisms. His interest in determining how these principles shape the diversity of life led him into his research and teaching career.


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Daniel Hartl

Daniel L. Hartl is Higgins Professor of Biology in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University and Professor of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health. He has taught highly popular courses in genetics and evolution at both the introductory and advanced levels. His lab studies molecular evolutionary genetics and population genetics and genomics. Dr. Hartl is the recipient of the Samuel Weiner Outstanding Scholar Award as well as the Gold Medal of the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served as President of the Genetics Society of America and President of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. Dr. Hartl’s PhD is from the University of Wisconsin, and he did postdoctoral studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Before joining the Harvard faculty, he served on the faculties of the University of Minnesota, Purdue University, and Washington University Medical School. In addition to publishing more than 400 scientific articles, Dr. Hartl has authored or coauthored 30 books.


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