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Scott Abernathy

After working as an on-street counselor for homeless adolescents in Boston, Scott received a master of curriculum and instruction and taught fourth and seventh grades in Wisconsin public schools. Hoping to learn more about the underlying systems that drove educational outcomes, Scott completed an M.P.A in domestic policy and then a Ph.D. in Politics from Princeton University. Scott is now an associate professor of political science and a University Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Minnesota. He is also the author of School Choice and the Future of American Democracy and No Child Left Behind and the Public Schools, both from University of Michigan Press.


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Shawn Alexander

Shawn Leigh Alexander (Ph.D., University of Massachusetts) is associate professor and graduate director of African and African American Studies and director of the Langston Hughes Center at the University of Kansas, where he specializes in African American social and intellectual history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The author of An Army of Lions: The Struggle for Civil Rights before the NAACP, he has also edited an anthology of T. Thomas Fortune's writings, T. Thomas Fortune, the Afro-American Agitator and written the Introduction to a reprint of William Sinclair's classic 1905 study, The Aftermath of Slavery: A Study of the Condition and Environment of the American Negro. He has also authored many scholarly articles and book chapters on early African American civil rights activity and black intellectual history.


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David A. Anderson

David Anderson is the Paul G. Blazer Professor of Economics at Centre College. He received his BA in economics from the University of Michigan and his MA and PhD in economics from Duke University. Anderson has been involved in the AP® Economics programs for more than two decades. For five years he led the grading of one or both of the AP® Economics exams, and he speaks regularly at AP® conferences and workshops. He has authored dozens of scholarly articles and 15 books, including Explorations in Economics, Survey of Economics, Cracking the AP® Economics Exam, Economics by Example, Favorite Ways to Learn Economics, and Environmental Economics and Natural Resource Management . His research is primarily on economic education, environmental economics, law and economics, and labor economics. Anderson loves teaching introductory economics and has won awards for excellence and innovation in the classroom. His favorite hobby is running, and he competes in marathons and triathlons. He lives in Danville, Kentucky, with his wife and two children.


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David Anderson

David Anderson is the Paul G. Blazer Professor of Economics at Centre College. He received his BA in economics from the University of Michigan and his MA and PhD in economics from Duke University. Anderson has been involved in the AP® Economics programs for more than two decades. For five years he led the grading of one or both of the AP® Economics exams, and he speaks regularly at AP® conferences and workshops. He has authored dozens of scholarly articles and 15 books, including Explorations in Economics, Survey of Economics, Cracking the AP® Economics Exam, Economics by Example, Favorite Ways to Learn Economics, and Environmental Economics and Natural Resource Management. His research is primarily on economic education, environmental economics, law and economics, and labor economics. Anderson loves teaching introductory economics and has won awards for excellence and innovation in the classroom. His favorite hobby is running, and he competes in marathons and triathlons. He lives in Danville, Kentucky, with his wife and two children.


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James M. Banner, Jr.

James M. Banner Jr. is an independent historian in Washington, D.C., whose scholarly interests have focused on the history of the United States between 1765 and 1865. A leader in the creation of the National History Center and cofounder and codirector of the History News Service, he is currently writing a book about what it means to be a historian today. He is most recently the coeditor, with John R. Gillis, of Becoming Historians (University of Chicago Press, 2009).


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Michael G. Baylor

Michael G. Baylor (Ph.D. Stanford University) is professor of history at Lehigh University, where he specializes in the history of early modern Europe and the social and cultural history of Germany at the time of the Reformation. His works include Revelations and Revolution: Basic Writings of Thomas Müntzer, The Radical Reformation, and Action and Person: Conscience in Late Scholasticism and the Young Luther, as well as a chapter on political thought during the Reformation for the Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy and numerous articles on the Reformation in Germany.


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Roger B. Beck

Roger B. Beck (Ph.D., Indiana University) is Distinguished Professor of African and twentieth-century world history at Eastern Illinois University. His publications include The History of South Africa, a translation of P. J. van der Merwe's The Migrant Farmer in the History of the Cape Colony, 1657-1842, and more than a hundred articles, book chapters, and reviews. He is a former treasurer and Executive Council member of the World History Association.


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Bedford/St.Martin's

Ryan M. Moeller earned his PhD from the University of Arizona, where he studied the cultural and pedagogical import of video and computer games with Ken McAllister, a leader in this groundbreaking new field. He is principal investigator for the Learning Games Initiative (LGI), an interdisciplinary and inter-institutional consortium made up of scholars and researchers studying computer games and gaming culture. As Assistant Professor of rhetoric and technology in the English department at Utah State University he employs a teaching philosophy that emphasizes play, through games or writing, as critical to the social process of learning.


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Charles T. Blair-Broeker

Charles Blair-Broeker taught at Cedar Falls High School (Iowa) for 36 years and now teaches part-time at Hawkeye Community College. Charlie has been involved in a number of American Psychological Association (APA) initiatives, including service as: • A member of the task force that authored the National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula; as the first elected chair of the Executive Board of Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools (TOPSS). • Co-editor of the fourth volume of the Activities Handbook for the Teaching of Psychology. • A member of the Steering Committees for the 2017 Summit on High School Psychology. Charlie also participated in the 2008 National Conference on Undergraduate Education in Psychology, and the 1999 National Forum on Psychology Partnerships. He has been a Test Developer, Question Leader, Rubric Master, Table Leader, and Reader for AP® Psychology since the test was first administered in 1992. He has given countless presentations about the teaching of psychology across the nation. Among his teaching awards are the Grinnell College Outstanding College Teacher Award, the University of Iowa Distinguished Teaching Award, and the APA Division 2 Teaching Excellence Award. The TOPSS Charles T. Blair-Broeker Excellence in Teaching Award was named after him in 2014, the same year he received an APA Presidential Citation for “exemplary efforts to promote high-quality instruction of and professionalism in teaching high school psychology.” He has been married for 40 joyous years to his wife Lynn. Together they keep up on the adventures of their kids Carl (married to Liz) and Eric (married to Brittany and father of Marin). Charlie plays pickleball most mornings with far more passion than precision.


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Louisa Bond Moffitt

Louisa Bond Moffitt holds a Ph.D. in U.S. History and has been teaching AP United States history at Marist School in Atlanta, Georgia, for more than twenty-eight years. She has been involved with the AP U.S. History reading for many years, serving as an exam leader and assistant chief reader for that exam. She is currently working as the question leader for the alternate AP U.S. History exam. In addition, she has been a member of the AP U.S. History test development committee, as well as several other test development committees. She has also coauthored a number of textbooks dealing with international relations built around conversations among former U.S. secretaries of state and defense. She has been active in the field of Middle East studies and has been recognized by the Middle East Studies Association for her work with both students and teachers. She is the chair of the History Department at Marist School and leads numerous AP U.S. workshops during the summers and throughout the school year.


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John Buckler

John Buckler (Ph.D., Harvard University), late of the University of Illinois, authored Theban Hegemony, 371-362 B.C., Philip II and the Sacred War, and Aegean Greece in the Fourth Century B.C.. With Hans Beck, he most recently published Central Greece and the Politics of Power in the Fourth Century.


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Patricia Buckley Ebrey

Patricia B. Ebrey (Ph.D., Columbia University), Professor of History at the University of Washington in Seattle, specializes in China. She has published numerous journal articles and The Cambridge Illustrated History of China, as well as numerous monographs.  In 2010 she won the Shimada Prize for outstanding work of East Asian Art History for Accumulating Culture: The Collections of Emperor Huizong.


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