Displaying 16-30 of 371

Robert Atwan

Robert Atwan is the series editor of the annual Best American Essays, which he founded in 1985. A former director of The Blue Hills Writing Institute at Curry College, Atwan has published essays, reviews, and critical articles in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The Atlantic Monthly, Iowa Review, Denver Quarterly, Kenyon Review, River Teeth, Creative Nonfiction, and many other publications. For Bedford/St. Martin’s, he has also edited Ten on Ten: Major Essayists on Recurring Themes (1992); Our Times (1998); and Convergences (2009). He has coedited (with Jon Roberts) Left, Right, and Center: Voices from Across the Political Spectrum (1996) and is editor of America Now (2017).


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Robin Dissin Aufses

Robin Dissin Aufses served as the English department chair at John F. Kennedy High School in Bellmore, New York, for ten years and is now English department chair at the Lycée Français de New York. She is a coauthor of The Language of Composition: Reading,  Writing, Rhetoric as well as the new publication, Literature and Composition. Aufses also has published articles for the College Board on the novelist Chang Rae Lee and the novel All the King's Men, and is a guest blogger at GothamSchools.org and highschoolbits.com.


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Rise B. Axelrod

Rise B. Axelrod is McSweeney Professor of Rhetoric and Teaching Excellence, Emeritus, at the University of California, Riverside, where she was also director of English Composition. She has previously been professor of English at California State University, San Bernardino; director of the College Expository Program at the University of Colorado, Boulder; and assistant director of the Third College (now Thurgood Marshall College) Composition Program at the University of California, San Diego. She is the co-author, with Charles R. Cooper, of the best-selling textbooks The St. Martin's Guide to Writing and The Concise St. Martin's Guide to Writing, as well as Reading Critically, Writing Well,.


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Nora Bacon

Nora Bacon is a Professor of English, Emeritus and former writing program administrator at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Her research, begun at UC Berkeley in the 1990s, has examined service-learning pedagogy, the development of "writing agility," and the relationship between texts and the contexts in which they are written and read. Nora’s current research focuses on the stylistic choices preferred in different disciplines, uniting her interest in variation and her abiding fascination with sentences.


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Lance Balla

Lance Balla is former curriculum developer in the Bellevue, WA school district, and current principal in the Everett, WA school district. He was an AP® teacher for almost twenty years, and a College Board® Faculty Consultant for over ten years, as well as being a reader and table leader for the AP® Literature Exam. Lance is a member of the College Board® English Academic Advisory Committee, has been a co-author on the College Board’s Springboard® program and was a member of the SAT® Critical Reading Test Development Committee. His awards and recognitions include the White House Distinguished Teacher Award, the Teacher Recognition Award from the U.S. Department of Education, the Washington State Award for Professional Excellence, and the Woodring College of Education Award for Outstanding Teaching.


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James M. Banner, Jr.

James M. Banner Jr. is an independent historian in Washington, D.C., whose scholarly interests have focused on the history of the United States between 1765 and 1865. A leader in the creation of the National History Center and cofounder and codirector of the History News Service, he is currently writing a book about what it means to be a historian today. He is most recently the coeditor, with John R. Gillis, of Becoming Historians (University of Chicago Press, 2009).


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Sylvan Barnet

Sylvan Barnet, professor of English and former director of writing at Tufts University, is the most prolific and consistently successful college English textbook author in the country. His several texts on writing and his numerous anthologies for introductory composition and literature courses have remained leaders in their field through many editions.


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Barclay Barrios

Barclay Barrios (PhD, Rutgers University) is Assistant Dean of the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters and Associate Professor of English at Florida Atlantic University, where he teaches freshman composition and graduate courses in composition methodology and theory, rhetorics of the World Wide Web, and composing digital identities. He is past Director of Instructional Technology at Rutgers University and has served on the board of Pedagogy. Barrios is a contributor to Bits: Ideas for Teaching Composition (Bedfordbits.com) and is a frequent presenter at professional conferences.


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David Bartholomae

DAVID BARTHOLOMAE (Ph.D., Rutgers University) is one of the composition community’s most highly regarded members. Professor of English and the Charles Crow Chair at the University of Pittsburgh, he has published widely on composition, rhetoric, literacy and pedagogy. He is a frequent lecturer to university faculty and writing projects nationwide. He has served as Chair of CCCC, President of the ADE, and on the MLA Executive Council. His awards include the MLA/ADE Francis A. March Award, the CCCC Exemplar Award, the CCCC Braddock Award, Pennsylvania Professor of the Year (2013), a Fulbright fellowship, and the University of Pittsburgh Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award. With Jean Ferguson Carr, he edits the University of Pittsburgh Series, Composition, Literacy and Culture. His collection of essays, Writing on the Margins: Essays on Composition and Teaching (Bedford/St. Martin’s) won the 2005 MLA Mina Shaughnessy Award. After stepping down as English department chair in 2009, he has been deeply involved with Pitt’s program for Study Abroad.


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Michael G. Baylor

Michael G. Baylor (Ph.D. Stanford University) is professor of history at Lehigh University, where he specializes in the history of early modern Europe and the social and cultural history of Germany at the time of the Reformation. His works include Revelations and Revolution: Basic Writings of Thomas Müntzer, The Radical Reformation, and Action and Person: Conscience in Late Scholasticism and the Young Luther, as well as a chapter on political thought during the Reformation for the Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy and numerous articles on the Reformation in Germany.


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Larry Beason

Larry Beason is associate professor of English and director of composition at the University of South Alabama. His teaching interests include composition, grammar, and the teaching of writing. He has published in journals such as Research in the Teaching of English and Journal of Business Communication.


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Roger B. Beck

Roger B. Beck (Ph.D., Indiana University) is Distinguished Professor of African and twentieth-century world history at Eastern Illinois University. His publications include The History of South Africa, a translation of P. J. van der Merwe's The Migrant Farmer in the History of the Cape Colony, 1657-1842, and more than a hundred articles, book chapters, and reviews. He is a former treasurer and Executive Council member of the World History Association.


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Hugo Bedau

Hugo Bedau, professor of philosophy at Tufts University, has served as chair of the philosophy department and chair of the university’s committee on College Writing. An internationally respected expert on the death penalty, and on moral, legal, and political philosophy, he has written or edited a number of books on these topics. He is the author of Thinking and Writing about Philosophy, Second Edition (Bedford/St. Martin’s).


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Bedford/St.Martin's

Ryan M. Moeller earned his PhD from the University of Arizona, where he studied the cultural and pedagogical import of video and computer games with Ken McAllister, a leader in this groundbreaking new field. He is principal investigator for the Learning Games Initiative (LGI), an interdisciplinary and inter-institutional consortium made up of scholars and researchers studying computer games and gaming culture. As Assistant Professor of rhetoric and technology in the English department at Utah State University he employs a teaching philosophy that emphasizes play, through games or writing, as critical to the social process of learning.


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Displaying 16-30 of 371
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