Displaying 106-120 of 371

Randal M. Ernst

Randal Ernst has been part of the high school psychology scene for more than 30 years. In 2017, American Psychological Association (APA) President, Antonio Puente, awarded Randy a Presidential Citation for “pioneering leadership of modern day pedagogy of psychology.” This honor was bestowed on Randy at the 2017 APA Summit on High School Psychology Education, an event Randy co-chaired. The APA’s Teachers of Psychology of Secondary Schools (TOPSS), which Randy helped found, recently honored him by establishing the “Randal M. Ernst Lecture”, given each year at the APA national convention. After serving on the initial AP® Psychology test development committee, Randy was the first high school teacher invited to be a Question Leader (and Exam Leader) at the AP® Psychology Reading. Randy has co-written articles published in numerous journals including American Psychologist, Teaching of Psychology, and The Oxford Review of Education. He has long been a proponent of flourishing, and coined the phrase “Positive Education” while preparing a presentation on teaching well-being with Marty Seligman for the Australian Department of Education. Randy has worked for years as a resilience trainer with the University of Pennsylvania and as a cultural proficiency trainer with the Lincoln Public Schools, which named Randy its Multicultural Educator of the Year in 2016. Additional honors include the NAACP’s Service to Children award, Nebraska’s Social Studies Educator of the Year award, Time-Warner’s “Crystal Apple” National Teacher Award, and his picture hangs in Broken Bow High School’s Distinguished Alumni hall of fame. The APA and the University of Nebraska have also recognized Randy for excellence in teaching. Randy’s bachelor and master’s degrees are from Nebraska Wesleyan University, and his doctorate is from the University of Nebraska. He is the proud father of Emily, Meredith, and Jocelyn.


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Paul Eschholz

Paul Eschholz and Alfred Rosa are professors emeriti of English at the University of Vermont. They have directed statewide writing programs and conducted numerous workshops throughout the country on writing and the teaching of writing.  Eschholz and Rosa have collaborated on a number of best-selling texts for Bedford/St. Martin's, including Subject & Strategy; Outlooks and Insights: A Reader for College Writers; Models for Writers; with Virginia Clark, Language Awareness; and, with Virginia Clark and Beth Simon, Language: Readings in Language.


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Benny Evans

Benny Evans received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Michigan. He is currently Professor of Mathematics at Oklahoma State University, where he has served as undergraduate director, associate head, and department head. He has held visiting appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study, Rice University, and Texas A&M. His research interests are topology and mathematics education.


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Kathryn Evans

Kathryn Evans (PhD, University of Illinois) is the director of the writing center and an associate professor of English at Bridgewater State University, where she teaches writing and writing pedagogy. A former writing program administrator, she has led numerous workshops on the teaching of writing. Her research focuses on refining key practices in writing instruction, exploring the role of silence in oral response and miscommunication in written response. This focus has led her to develop Real Questions, which interweaves scaffolded writing instruction and engaging readings.


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Brian Farrell

Brian D. Farrell is Director of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies and Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Curator in Entomology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University. He is an authority on coevolution between insects and plants and a specialist on the biology of beetles. He is the author of many scientific papers and book chapters on the evolution of ecological interactions between plants, beetles, and other insects in the tropics and temperate zone. Professor Farrell also spearheads initiatives to repatriate digital information from scientific specimens of insects in museums to their tropical countries of origin. In 2011–2012, he was a Fulbright Scholar to the Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic. Professor Farrell received a BA degree in Zoology and Botany from the University of Vermont and MS and PhD degrees from the University of Maryland.


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Dana Ferris

Dana Ferris is Professor and Associate Director for Lower-Division Writing in the University Writing Program at the University of California, Davis. An applied linguist by training (Ph.D., University of Southern California), she has many years of experience teaching in ESL/multilingual writing programs and in mainstream composition programs. She also has spent over 20 years as a teacher educator, working with future K-12 teachers, with M.A. students in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), Composition, and Reading, and with Ph.D. students in Linguistics, Education, and English.

Her research has focused extensively on response to student writing and on written corrective feedback in second language writing. Her work has been published in a range of journals including TESOL Quarterly, Research in the Teaching of English, Studies in Second Language Acquisition, Journal of Second Language Writing, Across the Disciplines, Writing and Pedagogy, TESOL Journal, and CATESOL Journal. 

She has previously published seven books. These teacher preparation and reference books have focused on the needs of multilingual/second language writers and readers and on responding to student writing. Titles include Teaching L2 Composition: Purpose, Process, and Practice (3rd Ed. 2013, with John Hedgcock, Routledge), Treatment of Error in Second Language Student Writing (2nd Ed. 2011, Michigan), and Teaching Readers of English (2009, with John Hedgcock, Routledge).


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Barbara Fister

Barbara Fister is a professor and librarian at Gustavus Adolphus College, where she directs the library's instruction program, works with the John S. Kendall Center for Engaged Learning, and teaches several courses, including a first-term seminar. She has published widely on information literacy, the future of publishing, and popular reading practices; she also has published a book on third world women's literatures, three novels, and is a weekly columnist for Library Journal and Inside Higher Ed.


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Jennifer Fleischner

Jennifer Fleischner (PhD, Columbia) is a professor of English at Adelphi University. She is the author of Mrs. Lincoln and Mrs. Keckly: The Remarkable Story of the Friendship Between a First Lady and a Former Slave (2003) and Mastering Slavery: Memory, Family, and Identity in Women's Slave Narratives (1996), as well as the historical novels Nobody’s Boy (2006), and I Was Born a Slave: The Story of Harriet Jacobs (1997). With Susan Weisser she is also the coeditor of Feminist Nightmares: Women at Odds: Feminism and the Problem of Sisterhood (1994).


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Christopher B. Fox

Christopher Fox chairs the Department of English at the University of Notre Dame.  He is the author of Locke and the Scriblerians: Identity and Consciousness in Early Eighteenth-Century Britain (1988) and the editor or coeditor of several books, including Psychology and Literature in the Eighteenth Century (1987); Teaching Eighteenth-Century Poetry (1990); Walking Naboth's Vineyard: New Studies of Swift (1995); and Inventing Human Science: Eighteenth-Century Domains (forthcoming).  He has lectured widely in the United States and abroad and is currently writing a book on Swift.


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Melanie Fox

Melanie Fox currently teaches economics at the University of Louisville after serving as Chair of the Department of Economics and Business Administration at Austin College. She earned her BA and PhD from the University of Houston. Fox has been an AP® Macroeconomics Reader and Table Leader since 2007.


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Chris Franklin

Christine (Chris) Franklin is the K–12 Statistics Ambassador for the American Statistical Association and an elected ASA Fellow. Now retired from the University of Georgia as the Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor and Senior Lecturer Emerita in Statistics, she is also the coauthor of an Introductory Statistics textbook published with Pearson and has published more than 60 journal articles and book chapters. Chris was the lead writer for the groundbreaking document of the American Statistical Association Pre-K–12 Guidelines for the Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) Framework and chaired the writing team of the ASA Statistical Education of Teachers (SET) report. She is a past Chief Reader for Advanced Placement® Statistics, a Fulbright scholar to New Zealand (2015), recipient of the United States Conference on Teaching Statistics (USCOTS) Lifetime Achievement Award and the prestigious ASA Founder’s Award, and is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute (ISI). Chris loves being with her family, running, hiking, scoring baseball games, and reading mysteries.


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Roger Freedman

Dr. Roger A. Freedman is a Lecturer in Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

He was an undergraduate at the University of California campuses in San Diego and Los Angeles, and did his doctoral research in theoretical nuclear physics at Stanford University. He came to UCSB in 1981 after three years of teaching and doing research at the University of Washington. At UCSB, Dr. Freedman has taught in both the Department of Physics and the College of Creative Studies, a branch of the university intended for highly gifted and motivated undergraduates. In recent years, he has helped to develop computer-based tools for learning introductory physics and astronomy and has been a pioneer in the use of classroom response systems and the “flipped” classroom model at UCSB. Roger holds a commercial pilot’s license and was an early organizer of the San Diego Comic-Con, now the world’s largest popular culture convention.


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Andrew Friedland

Andrew J. Friedland is The Richard and Jane Pearl Professor in Environmental Studies and Chair of the Environmental Studies Program at Dartmouth. He was the founding chair of the Advanced Placement Test Development Committee (College Board) for Environmental Science. He has a strong interest in high school science education and in the early years of APES he participated in a number of trainer and teacher workshops at Kimball Union Academy, Dartmouth College, and elsewhere. During many of the last ten summers, he has guest lectured at the St. Johnsbury Academy (Vermont) AP Institute for Secondary Teachers. Friedland regularly teaches introductory environmental science and energy courses and has taught courses in forest biogeochemistry, global change, and soil science, as well as foreign study courses in Kenya. For more than two decades, Friedland has been researching the effects of air pollution (lead, nitrogen, sulfur, calcium) on high-elevation forests of New England and the Northeast. More recently, he has begun investigating the impact of individual choices and personal action on energy consumption and the environment.  Friedland has served on panels for the NSF and USDA Forest Service and has just finished serving on his third panel of the Science Advisory Board of the EPA. He has authored or coauthored more than fifty-five peer-reviewed publications and one book, Writing Successful Science Proposals (Yale University Press). Friedland received BAs in Biology and Environmental Studies and a PhD in Geology from the University of Pennsylvania.  He is passionate about saving energy and can be seen wandering the halls of the Environmental Studies Program at Dartmouth with a Kill-A-Watt meter, determining the electricity load of vending machines, data projectors, and computers.


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Displaying 106-120 of 371
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